Dancing Your Way to Better Health

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By
WebMD Feature

Do you tap along with the beat as you watch? Or shimmy during the commercial breaks? This may be one time when health experts won’t fret if you follow in the footsteps of prime-time TV. Ballroom dancing could help the mind and body, they say.

Shall We Dance?

You’re not likely to practice for hours with a world-class dance partner as on the show. But you also won’t face live national TV and the judges’ barbs.

Will you get a good workout? What about those two left feet? And how can “twinkle toes” benefit your brain?

WebMD posed those questions to science, dance, and fitness pros. Here’s their spin on ballroom dancing’s health perks.

Is It Exercise?

The TV show’s contestants are often winded after their routines. One dancer from last season said he lost 15 pounds.

How typical is that? It depends on the type of dancing and your skill level, says exercise physiologist Catherine Cram, MS, of Comprehensive Fitness Consulting in Middleton, Wis.

“Once someone gets to the point where they’re getting their heart rate up, they’re actually getting a terrific workout,” says Cram.

Dance is a weight-bearing activity, which builds bones. It’s also “wonderful” for your upper body and strength, says Cram.

Would-be dancers should consult their doctors first, especially if they have any health problems, says Cram.

Calorie Check

How many calories will you burn? That depends on your body and how vigorously you dance.

Dance is a “moderate activity,” say the USDA’s physical activity guidelines. Adults should get at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity daily, according to the guidelines.

It can be easier to stick to that with fun activities, says Cram.

Muscles Worked

New ballroom dancers may feel muscles they didn’t know they had. That often happens with a new activity, says Ken Richards, spokesman for USA Dance, the national governing body of DanceSport — the competitive version of ballroom dancing.

Ballroom dancing often means moving backward, especially for women, says Richards, a professional ballroom dancing veteran.

“If you’re dancing the foxtrot, you’re taking long, sweeping steps backwards. That’s very different than walking forward on a treadmill or taking a jog around the neighborhood,” he says.

Ballroom dancing works the backs of the thighs and buttock muscles differently from many other types of exercise, says Richards.

Core Experience

The legs and arms often do the flashy dance moves. But they’re sunk without a strong body core.

The “core” muscles — the abs and back — are also used in Pilates, says Janice Byer. A lifelong dancer, Byer is group exercise director of The Courthouse Athletic Club in Oakland, Calif. Byer and her husband (whom she met through dancing) are avid swing dancers.

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